National Pollinator Week: JUNE 17-23, 2013 
Why you should care about the pollinators (pollinator.org):-   Approximately 1,000 plants worldwide need to be pollinated by animals to produce the food, medicine, and goods on which we depend. -   About 200,000 species of animals act as pollinators: 1,000 of those are hummingbirds, bats, and small animals, and the rest are insects like beetles, wasps, bees, moths and butterflies. -   Some plants depend upon a single pollinator species. If the pollinator disappears, so does the plant that produces that food or beverage. These interdependent foods include blueberries, chocolate, melons, almonds, and others.  -   75% of all flowering plants rely on animal pollinators. 
For a list of crops pollinated by bees, click HERE. 
The Xerces Society has a Pollinator Conservations Resource Guide, for different regions of the United States, HERE. 

National Pollinator Week: JUNE 17-23, 2013 

Why you should care about the pollinators (pollinator.org):
-   Approximately 1,000 plants worldwide need to be pollinated by animals to produce the food, medicine, and goods on which we depend. 
-   About 200,000 species of animals act as pollinators: 1,000 of those are hummingbirds, bats, and small animals, and the rest are insects like beetles, wasps, bees, moths and butterflies. 
-   Some plants depend upon a single pollinator species. If the pollinator disappears, so does the plant that produces that food or beverage. These interdependent foods include blueberries, chocolate, melons, almonds, and others.  
-   75% of all flowering plants rely on animal pollinators. 

For a list of crops pollinated by bees, click HERE

The Xerces Society has a Pollinator Conservations Resource Guide, for different regions of the United States, HERE

thebonegirl:

As you probably know, today is international women’s day. So I’m going to go right ahead and tell you that Maria Sibylla Merian is one of my favorite badass ladies of the science/art world.

Born in Germany during the mid 1600s, Merian began her artistic career at a young age, painting her first observations of insects around age 13. She spent  most of her life studying and composing beautiful watercolor paintings of her observations of nature and is most noted for being the first person to clearly record the life cycles of moths and butterflies. She made a self-funded expedition to Suriname where she recorded a bunch of previously unknown flora and fauna, she invented a washable fabric cloth, and published several books. Mind you, this was at a time when oil paints weren’t considered lady-like, the western world believed that moths and butterflies spontaneously birthed themselves from mud, and western ladies were advised not to go into tropical climates because it was known that women would furiously menstruate themselves into a hemorrhaging death.


Please do yourself a favor and go read a book about this woman. Thank you for your time.

I’ve written a few papers on her, but I don’t have the time to go dig them up right now. I’ll suggest some readings for you when I find them.

(via scientificillustration)

Microscopical:  Plate L1.   and 3. Scales of various butterflies2.   Eye of Hemerobius4.   Wing of Peacock Butterfly5.   Poppy Seeds6.   Wing-case of Green Weevil 7.   Egg of Red Underwing Moth8.   Egg of Small White Butterfly9.   Egg of Tortoiseshell Butterfly10. Egg of Lathonia Butterfly  Common Objects of the Country (1894) by Rev. J. G. Wood, illustrations by W. S. Coleman.

Microscopical:  Plate L
1.   and 3. Scales of various butterflies
2.   Eye of Hemerobius
4.   Wing of Peacock Butterfly
5.   Poppy Seeds
6.   Wing-case of Green Weevil 
7.   Egg of Red Underwing Moth
8.   Egg of Small White Butterfly
9.   Egg of Tortoiseshell Butterfly
10. Egg of Lathonia Butterfly  

Common Objects of the Country (1894) by Rev. J. G. Wood, illustrations by W. S. Coleman.