The Bug Hotel, Wightwick Manor, Wolverhampton, West Midlands: “This habitat is home to ladybirds, lacewing, frogs, and toads which help keep the garden pest free.” Photo: Declan O’Doherty.
This bug hotel was made from a pallet using found objects, including bricks, terra cotta, stones, hay, pine cones, blocks and branches. The items are carefully arranged in the pallet slots, filling the horizontal spaces tightly. The end result is a natural work of functional apartment-art for the bugs!

The Bug Hotel, Wightwick Manor, Wolverhampton, West Midlands: “This habitat is home to ladybirds, lacewing, frogs, and toads which help keep the garden pest free.” Photo: Declan O’Doherty.

This bug hotel was made from a pallet using found objects, including bricks, terra cotta, stones, hay, pine cones, blocks and branches. The items are carefully arranged in the pallet slots, filling the horizontal spaces tightly. The end result is a natural work of functional apartment-art for the bugs!

Pressed Flowers. The oldest, dated collection of plants at the Swedish Museum of Natural History, Arborum, fruticum et herbarum flores et folia in insula Gothlandia collecta annis (1701-02), by Antonius Christophori Münchenberg.

The flowers for the Herbarium were collected from 1699 to 1702, and contain 300 native and cultivated plant species from the island of Gotland, an island province of Sweden. 

Glass Beach

During the early 20th century residents of Fort Bragg, California chose to dispose of their waste by hurling it off the cliffs above a beach. No object was too toxic or too large as household appliances, automobiles, and all matter of trash were tossed into the crashing waves below, eventually earning it the name The Dumps. In 1967 the North Coast Water Quality Board closed the area completely and initiated a series of cleanups to slowly reverse decades of pollution and environmental damage. But there was one thing too costly (or perhaps impossible) to tackle: the millions of tiny glass shards churning in the surf. Over time the unrelenting ocean waves have, in a sense, cleansed the beach, turning the sand into a sparkling, multicolored bed of smooth glass stones now known as Glass Beach. The beach is now an unofficial tourist attraction and the California State Park System has gone so far as purchasing the property and incorporating it into surrounding MacKerricher State Park.

i.need.to.go.here.

(via johnmyersart)