Above, Panel No. 2 designed by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The Fight Between Tristram and Sir Marhaus.
Below, Panel No. 4 designed by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Tristram and Isoude Drink the Love Potion.

Tristram and Isoude, stained glass panels, executed by Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. (1862) for Walter Dunlop, a textile entrepreneur, for his home at Harden Grange near Bingley Yorkshire.
The stained glass panels of Tristram and Isoude illustrate “a story of unrequited love, full of passion and combat, enacted by a crowd of shadowy figures from a distant Celtic past.”

Above, Panel No. 2 designed by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The Fight Between Tristram and Sir Marhaus.

Below, Panel No. 4 designed by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Tristram and Isoude Drink the Love Potion.

Tristram and Isoude, stained glass panels, executed by Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. (1862) for Walter Dunlop, a textile entrepreneur, for his home at Harden Grange near Bingley Yorkshire.

The stained glass panels of Tristram and Isoude illustrate “a story of unrequited love, full of passion and combat, enacted by a crowd of shadowy figures from a distant Celtic past.”

The Raven by William Morris

I have always been intrigued by William Morris, a true Renaissance Man and a genius of design and image. He is credited (along with John Ruskin) as the founder of the Arts and Crafts Movement. His tapestries, wall paper patterns, and ceramic tiles are what dreams are made of. He flirted with architecture, book publishing and politics, leaving behind historical monuments that connect us to the complexities of his time. 

The Raven, a marble tile.