Inside the conservatory: orchids, succulents and sedums, Oh my!
There are plenty of house plants available from the nursery to create an indoor garden and adorn your home with a completely different palette of plant material than what you would find in an outdoor landscape. Put together a couple of terrariums in large glass vases, add an orchid or two from the floral shoppe, dress it all up with moss, stones, and cones ~ and the coffee table becomes a botanical treat. Just remember to group shade-loving plants together, and bright light plants together. Combine interesting foliage plants that complement one another. A terrarium also gives you something to tend, in case it’s too cold or too hot to go outside. 

Inside the conservatory: orchids, succulents and sedums, Oh my!

There are plenty of house plants available from the nursery to create an indoor garden and adorn your home with a completely different palette of plant material than what you would find in an outdoor landscape. Put together a couple of terrariums in large glass vases, add an orchid or two from the floral shoppe, dress it all up with moss, stones, and cones ~ and the coffee table becomes a botanical treat. Just remember to group shade-loving plants together, and bright light plants together. Combine interesting foliage plants that complement one another. A terrarium also gives you something to tend, in case it’s too cold or too hot to go outside. 

The Bug Hotel, Wightwick Manor, Wolverhampton, West Midlands: “This habitat is home to ladybirds, lacewing, frogs, and toads which help keep the garden pest free.” Photo: Declan O’Doherty.
This bug hotel was made from a pallet using found objects, including bricks, terra cotta, stones, hay, pine cones, blocks and branches. The items are carefully arranged in the pallet slots, filling the horizontal spaces tightly. The end result is a natural work of functional apartment-art for the bugs!

The Bug Hotel, Wightwick Manor, Wolverhampton, West Midlands: “This habitat is home to ladybirds, lacewing, frogs, and toads which help keep the garden pest free.” Photo: Declan O’Doherty.

This bug hotel was made from a pallet using found objects, including bricks, terra cotta, stones, hay, pine cones, blocks and branches. The items are carefully arranged in the pallet slots, filling the horizontal spaces tightly. The end result is a natural work of functional apartment-art for the bugs!

What a great idea. Going on vacation? Who will water your container gardens while you are away? I tried this last year for a client, with great success. What I did:

1) create a hole in the container garden about 3” deep with the empty neck of the wine bottle;

2) fill the wine bottle with water (if you want to add decorative stones in the bottle to filter the water, do so first);

3) hold fingers over the opening of the bottle and quickly tip it upside down (straight up or at a slight angle) into the hole you’ve already made in the container; and

4) quickly nestle the bottle into the soil, tapping soil around the neck opening to make sure it is stable and upright.

Smaller containers: try a beer bottle or other decorative glass bottle!